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April 2021

Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

Different Types of Foot Wounds

Foot wounds are open cuts or sores that form on the feet. There are several different types of foot wounds. Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) occur due to diabetes or diabetic neuropathy. They can appear anywhere on the foot, but often appear on the big toes, balls of the feet, and the heels. These wounds typically heal slowly and poorly. Venous stasis ulcers appear on the ankles or legs due to vein damage. Arterial ulcers are caused by arterial insufficiency or poor circulation, and usually occur between or on the tips of the toes and along the outer ankles. A pressure ulcer is caused by foot immobility or by wearing improper shoes. They are usually seen on the heels or ankles. If you have any wounds on your feet, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with William Urton, DPM from British Columbia. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Langley, BC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Flat Feet, Babies, and Adults

Fallen arches, which are known as flat feet, can affect pregnant women, people who are overweight, or patients who have an abnormal foot structure. There are some patients who can experience pain and discomfort as a result of flat feet. This may be a result of an inflamed tendon on the inside of the foot, or where the arch is normally located. The majority of babies are born with flat feet, and the arch typically develops by adulthood. There are stretches that can be performed which may help to bring mild relief, and this may eliminate the need for surgery. If you have flat feet, and would like information about specific shoes to wear or exercises to perform, please consult with a podiatrist.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact William Urton, DPM from British Columbia. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Langley, BC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Friday, 16 April 2021 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Monday, 12 April 2021 00:00

What is Morton’s Neuroma?

Women who wear high heels and are in their 30s and 40s are most at risk of developing Morton’s neuroma: a thickening of nerve tissues between bones on the bottom of the toes. This can cause a burning pain in the ball of the foot that graduates to a numbness or intense pins-and-needles feeling between the 3rd and 4th toes. Typical treatment for those with Morton’s neuroma calls for a change in footwear, either OTC or prescription painkillers and anti-inflammatory medications. If the condition persists for more than a year, a possible surgical solution to remove the damaged nerve or an endoscopic decompression to fix the nerve may become necessary. To learn more about treatment for Morton’s neuroma, please consult with a podiatrist.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact William Urton, DPM of British Columbia. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Langley, BC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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A burning sensation in the feet can affect any part of the foot and is typically caused by nerve damage. Various conditions can lead to nerve damage in the feet. One of the most common culprits is diabetes. About half of all people with diabetes develop peripheral neuropathy, which affects the nerves of the feet and can produce a burning sensation. Other medical problems that may damage the nerves that supply the feet, and therefore lead to a burning sensation, include small fiber sensory neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, complex regional pain syndrome, excessive alcohol use, and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Conditions that are not related to nerve damage can also produce a burning sensation in the feet. These include athlete’s foot, erythromelalgia, and hypothyroidism, among others. If you have burning feet, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with William Urton, DPM from British Columbia. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Langley, BC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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